FREE: National Drawing Contest for Kids, ages 4-15

Across the nation, youth, ages 4-15, are invited to create and submit a drawing of their idea of their “Dream Car” now through Tuesday, January 31, 2017. Full contest details, along with the required entry form and official rules, are available online at www.TFSintheCommunity.com/DreamCar.

In the spring of 2017, nine U.S. winners will be selected. Once accepted and awarded, their artwork will be submitted, along with entries from approximately 80 countries, for consideration in the World Contest. Thirty World Winners plus their parents or guardians will receive a trip to Japan to participate in an awards ceremony in August 2017 during which four additional awards will be announced per age category: Gold, Silver, Bronze, and Best Finalist. In previous years, U.S. Winners were selected to receive a trip to Japan to compete in the World Contest; among them was Lauren Park for her “Toyota Camera Car.”

Young people across the country are encouraged to participate. Last year, over 660,000 youth, ages 4-15 from nearly 80 countries submitted artwork to the Toyota Dream Car Art Contest worldwide. Of these, 630 entries were submitted to Japan for consideration in the World Contest. The first international contest was held in 2004 by Toyota Motor Corporation in Japan. This is the 6th year that the U.S. has held its National Contest.

Melissa Richardson Banks
CauseConnect LLC || Toyota Dream Car Art Contest
(213) 537-4483
mrb@causeconnect.net
www.causeconnect.net

 

TALK: Rethinking Charity by Dan Pallotta

TED-logoThis past spring, TED Talks featured activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta who shed light on the “double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities.” Too many nonprofits, he says, are rewarded for how little they spend — not for what they get done. Instead of equating frugality with morality, in this talk, he asks us to start rewarding charities for their big goals and big accomplishments (even if that comes with big expenses). In short, he says: “Let’s change the way we think about changing the world.”

What do you think about his ideas as shared in this talk?

 

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